Small Business Rising Seeks to Combat Monopolies

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A new coalition of independent businesses is urging policymakers to rein in monopolies and level the playing field that has long left independents at a disadvantage.

Called Small Business Rising, the coalition includes a diverse cross-section of business owners from across the U.S. united around a common goal: breaking up monopoly power to safeguard the right of small businesses to compete and serve their communities.

For the first time, small and independent businesses are adding their voices to the growing chorus calling for changes to federal policies that have allowed monopolies like Amazon to amass outsized power and influence.

“Concentrated market power is the single biggest threat facing independent businesses,” says Stacy Mitchell, co-director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR). “Every day, we lose more small businesses because of the abusive and anticompetitive tactics of Amazon and other monopolies. This campaign gives America’s entrepreneurs a platform to stand up and call on policymakers to check monopoly power and reinvigorate the antitrust laws.”

Small Business Rising is asking policymakers to:

  • Stop tech monopolies, such as Amazon, from cornering the online market by breaking them up
    and regulating them.
  • Block dominant corporations from using abusive tactics by strengthening antitrust laws and making them easier to enforce.
  • Outlaw mega-mergers and set a higher bar for allowing other mergers.

These organizations sent a letter to President Joe Biden urging the prioritization of antitrust efforts. They also hosted a virtual antimonopoly town hall that featured Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI) and drew nearly 400 business owners.

Independents who want to get involved in Small Business Rising’s objectives can download a free media kit full of graphics, prepared social media posts and information on how monopolies harm independents. Visit YourNHPA.org/sbr to download these free resources and share with your customers, small business peers and lawmakers.

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